Plagiarism

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*High school students are responsible to understand the issue and consequences of plagiarism. CAJ's curriculum requires that teachers teach and remind students about the illegality of using someone else's ideas or words without giving credit. Teachers do so before students work on assignments that require documentation. Therefore, plagiarism in high school is a serious offense; it is a form of stealing, and, if intentional, is cheating. The fact that we value collaboration does not imply that all work may be collaborative, and it is important for students to recognize when work must be completed independently. Ignorance about plagiarism is not an excuse.

    • CAJ subscribes to turnitin.com to help educate students about plagiarism and to help with enforcement.
    • CAJ uses the Modern Language Association (MLA) documentation format, which requires that students complete and hand in a works cited list whenever a student has quoted or paraphrased ideas or words from another person. Students are responsible to use the proper format both in their parenthetical references and in the works cited list.
      • To help students with proper citations, the Purdue University Online Writing Lab provides an excellent online reference at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_mla.html . Students are asked to use this web page or a copy of the MLA Handbook (Seventh Edition) to ensure that due credit is given and documentation is formatted correctly.
      • Exception: AP Psychology/Psychology class may be required to use APA (American Psychological Association) format. Some science classes may choose this format as well. This can also be found at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_apa.html.

Plagiarism Tutorial[edit]

Plagiarism Tutorial, The University of Southern Mississippi

  1. What is plagiarism?
  2. Why people plagiarize
  3. Types of Plagiarism
  4. Quoting
  5. Paraphrase
  6. Common knowledge
  7. Citations (Style guides)
  8. Style Quides
  9. Consequences
    • CAJ — High school students are responsible to understand the issue and consequences of plagiarism. CAJ's curriculum requires that teachers teach and remind students about the illegality of using someone else's ideas or words without giving credit. Teachers do so before students work on assignments that require documentation. Therefore, plagiarism in high school is a serious offense; it is a form of stealing, and, if intentional, is cheating. The fact that we value collaboration does not imply that all work may be collaborative, and it is important for students to recognize when work must be completed independently. Ignorance about plagiarism is not an excuse.
    • University and Beyond


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